We’ve teamed up with Boston Heart Diagnostics® to offer our patients exclusive and proprietary laboratory testing not routinely available, providing a comprehensive picture of your heart health.

 

Learn more about Boston Heart Diagnostics® here:

 

Description of your personalized diagnostic lab report:

 

We can conduct the following laboratory tests:

Basic testing

  • Comprehensive metabolic panel – sodium, potassium, chloride, bicarbonate, glucose, calcium levels; kidney function; liver function
  • Complete blood count
  • Urinalysis
  • Thyroid testing – including anti-thyroid antibodies
  • Iron panel
  • Vitamin D (25-OH) level
  • Vitamin B12 level
  • Folate level
  • Uric acid level
  • PSA level

Advanced Heart Disease Risk testing

  • Total cholesterol, HDL (“good” cholesterol), LDL (“bad” cholesterol), VLDL, triglycerides
  • Boston Heart HDL Map – not all HDL is equally “good”. HDL is actually composed of several different particles of different size. The HDL Map test determines what proportion of your HDL particles are large and what proportion are small. The large particles are protective against heart disease, while the small particles are not. For example, every 1 mg/dL increase in the very large α-1 HDL particle is associated with a 26% decrease in heart disease risk.
  • Apolipoprotein A-1 – this protein is used by the body to make HDL particles. Higher is better.
  • Apolipoprotein B – this protein is used by the body to make LDL particles. Lower is better.
  • Lipoprotein (a) – similar to LDL, high levels of this protein independently increases risk for heart attack, stroke, vein graft blockage, and retinal artery blockage (causing blindness).
  • Small dense LDL particles – this subset of LDL is especially blockage-inducing. High levels are associated with a 2- to 3-fold increased risk for heart attacks and strokes.
  • Boston Heart Cholesterol Balance Test – this test determines whether cholesterol is elevated due to cholesterol production by your liver or due to absorption of cholesterol from your diet.
  • Homocysteine level – elevated levels of this amino acid can directly cause damage to the inside lining of arteries.
  • N-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide (NT-proBNP) – this hormone is produced by the brain, and becomes elevated in patients with heart failure.

Genetic testing

  • Apolipoprotein E(ApoE) Genotype Test – this genetic test determines whether or not a patient is genetically predisposed to higher cholesterol levels.
  • Boston Heart Statin Myopathy (SLCO1B1) Genotype Test – this genetic test determines whether or not a patient is susceptible to muscle damage from taking statin drugs such as Lipitor.
  • Prothrombin(Factor II) Genotype Test – this genetic test determines whether or not a patient is at increased risk for developing blood clots.
  • Factor V Leiden Genotype Test – this genetic test also determines whether or not a patient is at increased risk for developing blood clots.
  • Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR) Genotype Test – this genetic test determines whether or not a patient is at increased risk for developing elevated homocysteine levels, which increases risk for heart disease and stroke.

Diabetes testing

  • Adiponectin – this is a hormone produced by fat cells that protects against heart disease and diabetes. Low levels increases risk of diabetes.
  • Glycated serum protein – the amount of glucose (blood sugar) attached to proteins in the blood. An indication of the average blood sugar level over the previous two to three weeks. Lower is better.
  • Hemoglobin A1c – the amount of glucose (blood sugar) attached to hemoglobin in red blood cells. An indication of the average blood sugar level over the previous two to three months. Lower is better.
  • Insulin level – this hormone regulates blood sugar levels. High levels are associated with Type 2 diabetes.
  • Insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) – a measure of whether insulin is regulating blood sugar levels appropriately. The presence of insulin resistance indicates a high risk of developing diabetes, heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol.
  • C-peptide – in patients injecting with insulin, this test helps to determine whether the pancreas is still producing insulin.

Inflammatory testing

  • High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (hs-CRP) – this test can detect very low levels of CRP that may be seen with blood vessel inflammation. An elevated level is an independent predictor of developing heart disease.
  • Myeloperoxidase (MPO) – this enzyme is made by white blood cells in the artery wall. Elevated levels indicate the presence of unstable plaque or buildup in the arterial wall and a high risk of having a heart attack within the next six months.
  • Lipoprotein-asssociated phospholipase A2 (LpPLA2) – this enzyme is produced by white blood cells that causes inflammation in the artery walls. Elevated levels doubles your risk for heart attack and stroke. If CRP is eleveated as well, stroke risk is increased 11-fold.

Fatty Acid Balance testing

  • Saturated fatty acid index – measures saturated fats in the blood, which increases heart disease risk. Lower is better.
  • Trans fatty acid index – measures trans fats in the blood, which markedly increases heart disease risk. Lower is better.
  • Monounsaturated fatty acid index – measures monounsaturated fats in the blood, which decreases heart disease risk. Higher is better.
  • Omega-3 fatty acid index – measures omega-3 healthy fats in the blood, including (alpha-linolenic acid) ALA, (docosahexaenoic acid) DHA, and (eicosapentaenoic acid) EPA, which reduce inflammation and reduce heart disease risk.
  • Omega-6 fatty acid index – measures omega-6 fats in the blood, including (linoleic acid) LA and arachidonic acid (AA).
  • Omega-6/Omega-3 ratio index – high omega-6 fats relative to omega-3 fats can increase inflammation and increase heart disease risk. Lower ratios are better.
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